Posts tagged “Shohin

Siberian elm shohin

This small Ulmus pumila was displayed at this year’s Toronto Bonsai Society Fall Show and Sale.

Ulmus pumila

Ulmus pumila shohin. Yellow pot by Sugiura Keisen, accent pot by John Pitt.

The tree was developed from a naturally layered low branch from a much larger elm that was collected from a hedge, along with many others.

The shohin elm was a low back branch on this larger tree (circled in red).

The shohin elm was a low back branch on this larger tree (circled in red).

After separating the rooted branch.

After separating the rooted branch in April 2011.

Summer 2011.

Summer 2011.


Shohin Siberian Elm Sacrifice Branch

One nice thing about Ulmus pumila is that thickening branches doesn’t take very long, especially when the tree is small like this one. I let this sacrifice branch run wild since the summer, and it will be cut off this fall as I am hoping to show this tree. The branch is almost at the thickness I want it to be at, but I might let both the lower branches run a bit next year.

Let's go fly a kite.

Let’s go fly a kite.

Branch from above; sacrifice branch is coming out of the left side.

Branch from above; sacrifice branch is coming out of the left which is the back of the branch when viewed from the front.

 

Closer view of the branch (left side).

Closer view of the branch.

 

 


A Pricey Little Japanese Black Pine

One thing that I found very interesting on my trip to Japan was the prices of bonsai. Take this stunning little (about 20 cm) japanese black pine below for example: it set the owner back ¥1,000,000 (about $12,500).

A cool million yen in the palm of your hand.

Why is this tree so expensive? Probably a number of reasons… small trees seem to be desirable right now, the bark was very good, the nebari and taper were both almost “perfect”, and the branch placement and ramification were outstanding. It is small details like this that make the difference between a ¥10,000 tree and a ¥1,000,000 tree in Japan. Nevertheless, a ¥10,000 tree in Japan is still pretty damn nice 🙂

I wonder if this tree would sell for $12K in North America? Europe? Maybe that isn’t even a fair question to ask given the difference in the markets for bonsai.