Grafting Hinoki on Thuja (Arborvitae) Part 2

See here for Part 1.

My Thuja are starting to lose their winter colour, so I figured now was as good a time as any to make my first attempt at grafting hinoki foliage to this old bare tree.

Ready for grafting.

Ready for grafting.

The type of graft I attempted was a type of side veneer graft, as shown in the image below.

Side veneer graft.

Approximate size of the scions used. Hopefully they aren't too big? I chose the size based on images I've seen of people doing the same type of grafting on juniper.

Approximate size of the scions used. Hopefully they aren’t too big? I chose the size based on images I’ve seen of people doing the same type of grafting on juniper.

 

A (very tight) elastic band was used to initially secure the scion to the rootstock. This is a nice trick I learned at a recent grafting workshop. It allows you to still "tweak" the position of the scion after it is secured to the tree, to ensure that the cambium is aligned properly. There are special UV resistant elastics designed for this job, but I just used old kitchen elastics. A tight layer of teflon tape went over the elastic to protect the wound.

A (very tight) elastic band was used to initially secure the scion to the rootstock. This is a nice trick I learned at a recent grafting workshop. It allows you to still “tweak” the position of the scion after it is secured to the tree, to ensure that the cambium is aligned properly. There are special UV resistant elastics designed for this job, but I just used old kitchen elastics. A tight layer of teflon tape went over the elastic to protect the wound.

Three grafts in total were attempted. One was covered in a clear plastic bag. For another, the scion was wrapped in parafilm (which apparently breaks down quickly enough that the scion can actually grow right out of it). The last one was left unprotected. Professional propagators don’t wrap their scions in anything, but they also have fancy greenhouses to control their environment. We’ll see what happens.

To be honest, I am not feeling very confident about these grafts. I did the best I could, but I feel that I am at a big disadvantage without having a greenhouse. But nothing ventured, nothing gained – right? If these fail, I will try approach grafting and possibly some more side veneer grafting in the late spring.

Fingers crossed!

2 Responses

  1. Pingback: Thuja Grafting Round 2 « Lakeshore Bonsai: Bonsai in Toronto, Canada

  2. Pingback: Grafting Hinoki on Thuja occidentalis Round 3 | Lakeshore Bonsai: Bonsai in Toronto, Canada

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