Bending a Heavy Jin and Initial Styling of a Cascade Thuja

I collected this cedar in 2013 and only this year decided to style it as a full cascade. The big character jin jutting towards the lower left is amazing, but presents a practical challenge for getting the tree into a classic cascade pot. Instead of removing it, I thought it would be interesting to try to bend it flush to the trunk. In addition to solving the pot problem, it would also add some thickness to the base of the trunk, which has some distracting reverse taper.

The cascade style is often a solution for a tree that emerges from the soil with a sharp bend.

The cascade style is often a solution for a tree that emerges from the soil with a sharp bend.

Before bending the jin. This image also better shows the reverse taper of the trunk.

Before bending the jin. This image also better shows the reverse taper of the trunk.

Some of the jin had to be shortened so it could clear the soil surface when bent in.

Some of the jin had to be shortened so it could clear the soil surface when bent in. I hate removing ancient deadwood from collected trees, but sometimes it is necessary to realize the design. 

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The elbow of the jin was notched and some wood removed from the back. It was also wrapped in a wet rag several days before the operation.

Strategic parts of the jin were protected with aluminum foil then steamed with a torch to facilitate the bending. Two clamps were used to crank the jin in.

Strategic parts of the jin were protected with aluminum foil then steamed with a torch to facilitate the bending. Two clamps were used to crank the jin in.

We were amazed that the jin did no even show signs of cracking or tearing. When flush with the trunk, it was secured with two stainless steel screws.

We were amazed that the jin did not show signs of cracking or tearing. When flush with the trunk, it was secured with two stainless steel screws.

A better look at the bend jin.

A better look at the bent jin.

The bent jin from the back.

The bent jin from the back.

After setting the basic structure. The two unnecessary branches will be kept for a year or two until the main foliage mass gains more vigour. Hopefully this will help minimize dieback of the two live veins, both of which are visible from the front.

After setting the basic structure. The two unnecessary branches will be kept for a year or two until the main foliage mass gains more vigour. Hopefully this will help minimize dieback of the two live veins, both of which are visible from the front.

Photoshop without sacrifice branches. The crown will probably be 30% larger in the future.

Photoshop without sacrifice branches. The crown needs to be about 30% larger to better balance out the massive trunk. 

Image from May 2015 repotting. This tree has a surprisingly compact root ball and while it will not be easy to get this into a cascade pot, I think it will be possible without any major operations.

Image from May 2015 repotting. This tree has a surprisingly compact root ball and while it will not be easy to get this into a cascade pot, I think it will be possible without any major operations.

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