Larches…

When you have a lot of larches spring can be somewhat of a disaster. Pruning, wiring, unwiring, and collecting more larches (glutton for punishment) all tend to fall within a fairly short window.

That being said, here are some larches at various stages of development that I have been working on over the past few weeks of this very strange spring (weather-wise).

This sinuous larch was styled a couple of weeks ago. A massive root was further reduced and it was planted in its first bonsai pot. Collected larches usually come with one or more massive root(s) which fortunately can be reduced over successive transplants. This will need one more big root operation in a couple of years.

This sinuous larch was collected in 2014 and styled a couple of weeks ago. A massive root was further reduced and it was planted in its first bonsai pot. Collected larches usually come with one or more massive root(s) which fortunately can be reduced over successive transplants. This will need one more big root operation in a couple of years.

This big larch was collected in 2014 and transplanted this year. It also had a massive root cut back closer to the trunk. It has a wild character and will take some pondering to find the best front and planting angle.

This big larch was collected in 2014 and transplanted this year. It also had a massive root cut back closer to the trunk. It has a wild character and will take some pondering to find the best front and planting angle.

The same larch from another intriguing (but still challenging) angle.

The same larch from another intriguing (but still challenging) angle.

This stout little shohin was divided from the root system of the previous larch. After a year or two for root development, it will be planted at the correct angle and will be pretty easy to make into a nice little tree.

This stout little shohin was divided from the root system of the previous big larch. After a year or two for root development, it will be planted at the correct angle and will be pretty easy to make into a nice little tree. Without the old bark, this would not be worth much, but it is old and therefore has some good potential.

This tree was styled for the first time last spring and is developing quickly. This year the wire was checked and the branches were trimmed.

This chuhin-sized larch was styled for the first time last spring and is developing quickly. This year the wire was checked and the branches were trimmed with the aim of further developing the ramification. Can you see the single cone on this tree?

Last year this tree only produced one cone. Fortunately it happened to be in an ideal position and has reached maturity.

The one cone this tree produced last year happened to be in an ideal position and managed to hang on over the winter. The cone is about 1 cm tall. 

This tiny larch is notoriously difficult to photograph. Besides pruning, this tree has never been styled. It has been set back due to falling off the bench twice (once my fault, the second because of racoons). The bark, taper, and trunk movement are ideal. Next spring it will likely be wired. This year I just transferred it into a Nick Lenz pot.

This tiny larch (collected 2013) is notoriously difficult to photograph. Besides pruning, this tree has never been styled. Its development has been set back due to falling off the bench twice (once my fault, the second because of raccoons ). The bark, taper, and trunk movement are ideal. Next spring it will likely be wired. This year I just transferred it into a Nick Lenz pot.

This tree has taught me that larch are not as easy to thread graft as I would have thought. Nick Lenz estimates a 33% success rate. I have a 0% success rate. I am trying bud grafting on some larches, and (fingers crossed) seem to be having some success.

This tree has taught me that larch are not as easy to thread graft as I would have thought. Nick Lenz estimates a 33% success rate. I have a 0% success rate. This year I am trying bud grafting on some larches, and (fingers crossed) seem to be having some success. I will also give summer thread grafting a try.

Pruning and wire removal were the normal spring chores for this little forest.

Pruning and wire removal were the normal spring chores for this little forest.

This tree was collected in 2012 and had major root operations in 2014 and again in 2016. Finally, it fits into a bonsai pot. Last year some rough structural work was done. This year will focus on pruning and developing branching so it can be styled next spring.

This craggy tree was collected in 2012 and had major root operations in 2014 and again in 2016. Finally, it fits into a bonsai pot. Last year some rough structural work was done. This year will focus on pruning and developing branching so it can be styled next spring. One thing I’ve learned with collected trees is that not rushing them will often help you achieve your goals faster. 

Old larch bark.

Old larch bark.

4 Responses

  1. crust

    Nice “rarch”! The larch wave of early spring responsibilities really got me this year. My wife calls herself a bonsai widow

    May 10, 2016 at 9:49 pm

  2. Nigel Saunders

    Every spring I say I have too many trees, the rest of the year I wish I had more!
    Good stuff with the Larches, see you at the show.

    May 11, 2016 at 8:33 am

  3. Gail

    Love the Larch they are a challenge but so delicate looking have a forest and will be planting another one this spring.

    May 22, 2016 at 5:24 pm

  4. Edwin Kuipers

    Gorgous larches! As someone who is looking to start collecting larch in the Ontario area, do you have any pointers or suggestions for great locations to find larch yamadori? I know your locations may be secret, but I would truly apprieciate some help to find amazing larch yamadori!

    Thanks, Edwin.

    May 23, 2016 at 9:14 pm

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